38 Comments
Commenting has been turned off for this post
founding

Good article. I am starting to suspect that a large number, possibly the majority of Canadian's have no political party that truly represents them. Unfortunately I find myself in that number, and really wonder what I will do next election.

Expand full comment

I am one of those voters without a home. I am in that 'Blue Liberal/Red Tory' band. I am very concerned with lagging productivity as that has such a huge downstream impact on all public policy; as the economy fails to meaningfully grow, we're left arguing about how to redistribute (or not) the same size pie.

While parties vie for 'engaged' voters by promising to fix issues that they really have limited ability to deliver on, their constituencies are getting smaller and more partisan. Meanwhile, they seem to be actively encouraging people like me to get disengaged.

I suspect -- and hope -- that some smart party (even if it's a new party) will see that gap and fill it. I don't know a lot of actual partisans beyond the digital realm; I suspect there are a lot of fairly disengaged, discouraged people who might vote for a party that stops yelling, promises things they can actually deliver (then does) and generally focused on "peace, order and good government". But, maybe I'm dreaming.

FWIW, though, I do think that Del Duca was an uninspiring candidate and his platform seemed full of the kind of gimmicks that made it hard for voters like me to take him seriously.

Expand full comment
Jun 7, 2022·edited Jun 7, 2022

"It doesn’t think much about economics or fiscal policy." One of the most frightening ideas for any political party, for shouldn't voter income be one of a government's highest priorities?

I wish I had an argument for any of this, but sadly can't find any. I believe the economic situation is now so bad that governments will do anything to avoid having to deal with it. Its cause is a lack of vision, a quest for power, and the reality that you can no longer get elected by telling the truth. The vacuum of leadership at all levels is slowly killing Canada.

Expand full comment

I think the disappearance of the Business Liberals is part of a bigger problem where politicians have neglected the basic functions of government in favor of chasing exciting ideas. Our federal Liberal government wants to pursue universal childcare, but hasn't demonstrated the basic competence to issue passports and staff airport security. City councils debate decarbonization and climate change policy, but won't issue building permits in a timely fashion or provide oversight to police forces to deal with public safety concerns. People and politicians clamoring for more government involvement in society and the economy seem oblivious to the fact that government isn't doing particularly well at managing its baseline functions. Start getting that right, and maybe people will be more interested in letting you explore the next big sky idea.

Expand full comment

Excellent article & comments. Wynne failed to take care of the revenue side of the ledger .Ford ( although not my favorite person ) is doing that , thereby strengthening the economy now & for the future . This activity directly improves socioeconomic balance , a root cause of so many problems.

🇺🇦♥️🇨🇦⚡️

Expand full comment

In Nova Scotia I had the option of voting for Liberals or Progressive Conservatives. Federally that option has disappeared. Yes - Liberals are more left now. But look at the right! Endless debate about who supported the convoy in Ottawa more. If thar focus continues, I can understand why the comments section reflects people who feel they don’t have a political party to support.

Expand full comment

Bill Morneau got his experience from his family, his political connections and his HR firm that works for large corporations that acquire wealth, not create it. He has absolutely no courage to do what it takes to trash these kinds of monopolies. He favours SNC Lavalin, as all Liberals currently do, so where this author gets off saying this current iteration of the Liberals doesnt do exactly what Rogers, Telus, Loblaws and the BoC tell them to do, I don't know, but something tells me these monopolies own both parties.

Expand full comment

With the embrace of federal NDPers by the Liberals, there is no longer a "l"iberal party. It's become the NDP. The Progressive Conservative party (ON) policies are not "c"onservative they're "l"iberal and there is no viable conservative party as yet either provincially or federally.

The liberals actually won in Ontario...they just called themselves Ford conservatives.

Expand full comment

Ford won because people didn’t vote. It’s not surprising. Everyone is exhausted.

Last summer we had a Spongy Caterpillar plague on top of COVID. It did a huge amount of damage. Then we had a fierce winter. Then, rain, rain, rain, rain and a BIG windstorm that resulted in the loss of electricity for a huge number of people, some for over a week. Many roads were impassable.

Ford got lucky.

Expand full comment

Since when have the Liberals of today ever been stuck in the middle of the road? They have been too busy passing on the left, caught some loose gravel on the shoulder, went straight into the ditch so hard that they knocked the engine into the trunk.

Expand full comment

Good article. The last government that had a strong focus on the economy was Mulroney's. Chretien was a feel-good PM who took no risks. Harper focused his attention on primary industries and riding economics while losing 450,000 manufacturing jobs. Trudeau would be a perfect leader for the NDP. Who will lead us out of this morass?

Expand full comment

Forgive my pedantry, but the NDP - not David Peterson - ended the ban on Sunday shopping.

Expand full comment

Canadians of all stripes quite frankly have their hand out. We are an entitled people who ask "what can government deliver for me?"

Expand full comment

Ah, horse-race pieces. How they love them.

When pro-Iraq-War columnists weren't fired for being so wrong, I thought it was some rotten biased media publisher thing, but then financial columnists who got the Global Financial Crisis wrong, stayed too. I finally got that columnists aren't paid to be right, just to "drive engagement", and horse-races, as competitions, just engage more than policy, which is just about doing work.

But I can't read horse-race pieces since Trump; all I can think, as they write confidently about what this group of voters 'thinks', or that group 'feels', is that They All Missed Trump, They All Missed Trump.

Expand full comment

We all like to have good government programs that promise good services like a comprehensive health system etc., so I can see why there are so many people that vote for the Troo Doh type of Liberalism. The trouble is, these same people have no care about where the money comes from to pay for it all, as long as it doesn't come out of their pockets in the form of increased taxes. It would be nice to have the statistic on Ontario for instance, what percentage of voters who vote Liberal are government employees. These people don't seem to have any care at all that the money to pay for all the borrowed $ to pay for these wonderful things will be coming out of the pockets of their (and our) children and grandchildren. To me, these voters are simply reprehensible. It's like parents saying to their kids just out of high school, mum and I going on a three month around the world vacation. See you in 3. And then when they are back, they give the kids bright shiny new credit cards in their own names as a gift. Followed by: "Oh, there is $50,000 charged up on each card to pay for our vacation. Have fun being an adult.

Expand full comment
Comment removed
Expand full comment